nebulasnovasandnightsky:

look if you unironically say ‘money can’t buy happiness’ then either you’ve never faced a real financial struggle or you’ve achieved enlightenment, because goddamn does financial security feel an awful lot like happiness when it’s something you’re not used to

(Source: gardenheights, via monsterroddy)

"My idea of rich is that you can buy every book you ever want without looking at the price and you’re never around assholes. That’s the two things to really fight for in life."

— John Waters  (via detailsdetales)

(Source: marion--crane, via kateordie)

"

People can forgive toxic parents, but they should do it at the conclusion—not at the beginning—of their emotional housecleaning. People need to get angry about what happened to them. They need to grieve over the fact that they never had the parental love they yearned for. They need to stop diminishing or discounting the damage that was done to them. Too often, “forgive and forget” means “pretend it didn’t happen.”

I also believe that forgiveness is appropriate only when parents do something to earn it. Toxic parents, especially the more abusive ones, need to acknowledge what happened, take responsibility, and show a willingness to make amends. If you unilaterally absolve parents who continue to treat you badly, who deny much of your reality and feelings, and who continue to project blame onto you, you may seriously impede the emotional work you need to do. If one or both parents are dead, you can still heal the damage, by forgiving yourself and releasing much of the hold that they had over your emotional well-being.

At this point, you may be wondering, understandably, if you will remain bitter and angry for the rest of your life if you don’t forgive your parents. In fact, quite the opposite is true. What I have seen over the years is that emotional and mental peace comes as a result of releasing yourself from your toxic parents’ control, without necessarily having to forgive them. And that release can come only after you’ve worked through your intense feelings of outrage and grief and after you’ve put the responsibility on their shoulders, where it belongs.

"

— Susan Forward, Toxic Parents, ch 9 (via fromonesurvivortoanother)

(via doctorcakeray)

meredithmo:

Ungggh, this is so good. Bless you, Rebecca Traister. <3

I wish it were different. I wish that every woman whose actions and worth are parsed and restricted, congratulated and condemned in this country might just once get to wheel aroundon the committee that doesn’t believe their medically corroborated story of assault, or on the protesters who tell them that termination is a sin they will regret, or on the boss who tells them he doesn’t believe in their sexual choices, or on the mid-fifties man who congratulates them, or himself, on finding them appealing deep into their dotageand go black in the eyes and say, “I don’t fucking care if you like it.”

(via wilwheaton)

edwardspoonhands:

gemmacorrell:

(via Four Eyes Comic Strip on GoComics.com)

WORRY STUMPS!!!
"In other words, the question, “aren’t we all queer/disabled?” can be an indirect way of saying, “you don’t need to be taken seriously, do you?” In some very important ways, we are in fact not all queer/disabled. The fact that some of us get beaten and left for dead tied to deer fences or that others of us die virtually unnoticed in underfunded and unsanitary group homes should be enough to highlight that the heterosexual/queer and able-bodied/disabled boundaries produce real and material distinction."

-Robert McRuer, Composing Queerness and Disability: The Corporate University and Alternative Corporealities

(via macklaaaa)

(via monsterroddy)

My story? It’s exactly the same as your story, just one chapter behind. I chased a man across the seven seas. The pursuit cost me my crew… my commission… and my life.

(Source: mastertook, via pietromaxmioffs)

marshmallow-the-vampire-slayer:

Buffy the Vampire Slayer - Rupert Giles, The Quotable Librarian

(via doctorcakeray)

janetmock:

My dear friend and sister reina gossett’s dream is to tell Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson’s story on the night of Stonewall. Please share, give and support this powerful short film!

(via lindabelchervoice)

vastderp:

quintessence-of-dust:

Kacy Catanzaro: the first woman in history to qualify for Mt. Midoriyama.

I just need everyone to watch this video [x]. She’s a 5 foot, 100 lb gymnast and she beasts through this insanely difficult, heavily upper body focused course like it was her morning jog. The camera keeps cutting to these massive, musclebound men in the audience with their mouths hanging open. 

OH SNAP this photoset shows those insane vertical obstacles, look at her go.

(Source: felicityperhaps, via bemusedlybespectacled)

Anonymous said: Towards the whole "pronouns hurt people's feelings" topic. Am I REALLY the only person on the planet that thinks people are becoming far to sensative? Nearly to the point that they shouldn't leave their little home bubbles in the case that a bird chirps next to them in a way that sounds like a mean word. Maybe, JUST MAYBE, we're becoming a little TOO coddling and people need to learn to deal with simplistic shit like words. And yes, I've been insulted and made fun of. I got over it. So can you.

thefrogman:

Supposedly invented by the Chinese, there is an ancient form of torture that is nothing more than cold, tiny drops falling upon a person’s forehead. 

On its own, a single drop is nothing. It falls upon the brow making a tiny splash. It doesn’t hurt. No real harm comes from it. 

In multitudes, the drops are still fairly harmless. Other than a damp forehead, there really is no cause for concern. 

The key to the torture is being restrained. You cannot move. You must feel each drop. You have lost all control over stopping these drops of water from splashing on your forehead. 

It still doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. But person after person, time and time again—would completely unravel psychologically. They all had a breaking point where each drop turned into a horror. Building and building until all sense of sanity was completely lost. 

"It was just a joke, quit being so sensitive."

"They used the wrong pronoun, big deal."

"So your parents don’t understand, it could be worse."

Day after day. Drop after drop. It builds up. A single instance on its own is no big deal. A few drops, not a problem. But when you are restrained, when you cannot escape the drops, when it is unending—these drops can be agony. 

People aren’t sensitive because they can’t take a joke. Because they can’t take being misgendered one time. Because they lack a thick skin. 

People are sensitive because the drops are unending and they have no escape from them. 

You are only seeing the tiny, harmless, single drop hitting these so-called “sensitive” people. You are failing to see the thousands of drops endured before that. You are failing to see the restraints that make them inescapable.

conelradstation:

Tom Waits, Long Way Home (Orphans, 2006)

I put food on the table
And roof overhead
But I’d trade it all tomorrow
For the highway instead
Watch your back if I should tell you
Love’s the only thing I’ve ever known
One thing for sure pretty baby I always take the long way home

You know I love you baby
More than the whole wide world
You are my woman
I know you are my pearl
Let’s go out past the party lights
Where we can finally be alone
Come with me and we can take the long way home

red flags

moopflop:

  • calling the legitimate anger of oppressed people “drama” or “hate”
  • referring to allocation of human rights as simply “politics”
  • referring to basic human empathy as “political correctness”
  • the childlike refusal to admit mistakes and throwing a literal tantrum
  • "it’s just my opinion"

(via msjayjustice)

beautyandterrordance:

"Sometimes I have wondered whether life wouldn’t be much more amusing if we were all devils, no nonsense about angels and being good”, via universalmonstersblog.

(Source: fred---astaire)

drain-seeker:

Fake Geek Girls (x)

(via albinwonderland)